HFE Magazine

October 6, 2014

Omega 3s

Filed under: Depression,Diet,Family — Gail @ 10:35 am

Here are excerpts from two recently released studies about Omega 3 oils and their role in our lives. In this country, the US, we have forgotten about nutrition acquired from the food we eat and have a terrible tendency to rely on the “One-A-Day Solution”. It is time to get back to eating real foods that are not packed with excitotoxins, sugars and empty calories! Who ever heard of feeding your children salmon for dinner instead of McDonalds? Well, here is the result:

Oily fish may reduce dementia risk: Transcontinental study

By Stephen Daniells, 08-Jul-2009

Increased intake of fish may reduce the risk of dementia by about 20 per cent, according to a new study spanning three continents. Data from 14,960 people in seven countries indicated that the more fish consumed, the more beneficial the effects, researchers report in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

“We showed for the first time that a statistically significant trend toward a lower prevalence of dementia among those with higher dietary fish intake in large population-based samples of older people living in 5 countries in Latin America, China, and India,” wrote the researchers led by Emiliano Albanese from King’s College London.

Two earlier studies published in April 2007 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition reported that regular consumption of omega-3-rich food could prevent age-related cognitive decline. The studies, from the Dutch National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, and the University of North Carolina, stated that only a limited number of studies have looked at the decline in cognitive function that precedes these diseases. The majority of science for the health benefits of fish and omega-3 consumption has focused on cardiovascular health, but the science for cognitive benefits is growing and almost as compelling as the heart health data.

Transcontinental support

Albanese and his co-workers examined the links between dementia and fish and meat intake in low- and middle-income countries, including China, India, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Venezuela, Mexico, and Peru. “To our knowledge, this is the largest population-based study on this topic to date from either developing or developed country samples,” they said. Almost 15,000 people aged 65 or over were surveyed. After adjusting for various facters and pooling the data from all the sites, the researchers report that they observed a dose-dependent inverse association between dementia and fish consumption.
On the other hand, meat consumption was found to increase dementia risk.

“More substantive evidence will come from the incidence phase of our project, in which we will be able to compare the incidence of dementia according to dietary exposure at baseline, and from randomized controlled trials of the effectiveness of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids supplementation for the prevention of cognitive decline,” said the researchers.

Source: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Published online ahead of print, 24 June 2009, doi:10.3945/ajcn.2009.2758
“Dietary fish and meat intake and dementia in Latin America, China, and India: a 10/66 Dementia Research Group population-based study”

Here is the excerpt from the other article. Wow! It makes me want to take my Omega 3s and eat more fish!:

Omega-3 deficiency causes 96,000 US deaths per year, say researchers

By Shane Starling, 26-Jun-2009

Omega-3 deficiency is the sixth biggest killer of Americans and more deadly than excess trans fat intake, according to a new study. The Harvard University researchers looked at 12 dietary, lifestyle and metabolic risk factors such as tobacco smoking and high blood pressure and used a mathematical model to determine how many fatalities could have been prevented if better practices had been observed. The study, jointly funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) through the Association of Schools of Public Health, drew on 2005 data from the US National Health Center for Health Statistics. They determined that there were 72,000-96,000 preventable deaths each year due to omega-3 deficiency, compared to 63,000-97,000 for high trans fat intake.

Power of diet

At the Natural Products Association, Dan Fabricant, PhD, emphasized the potential public health care savings that could be derived from better nutrition, especially in tight economic times, but called for further study. “We need more clinical research that nails down why omega-3 is so effective,” Fabricant said. “This seems to be the last missing piece for omega-3s in terms of clarifying the picture for governmental/regulatory bodies of its efficacy.” Shao added the study highlighted the importance of establishing a dietary reference intake (DRI) for omega-3 forms, EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid).

“…this new study validates that Omega-3 EPA/DHA is more than just part of a healthy diet…it’s a matter of life and death,” said Ocean Nutrition Canada’s vice president of marketing and communications, Lori Covert. “We know that daily doses of Omega-3 EPA/DHA can help with many conditions, such as cardiovascular disease, and we’re committed to increasing consumer awareness about the drastic Omega-3 EPA/DHA deficiency in the Western diet,” Covert said.

Source: Public Library of Science Medicine Journal
Vol. 6, April, 2009

‘The Preventable Causes of Death in the United States: Comparative Risk Assessment of Dietary, Lifestyle, and Metabolic Risk Factors’

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