HFE Magazine

April 23, 2019

Why are Statins Bad for You?

Filed under: Health Food Emporium,Heart Health,Weight Loss — Gail @ 12:56 pm

Why are our doctors still pushing statins at us as though they were the cure for heart disease – or the cure for anything at all?! I recently went to a new doctor and the very first thing out of his mouth was, “your cholesterol is a little high so we’ll get you a prescription for statins right away.” Excuse me? The 90s are calling and they want their doctor back!

Study after study has been release over the last 20 years proving that lowering your cholesterol with statin drugs is dangerous. if your doctor is stuck on statins, get a new doctor! I did!

In his recent book, Hormone Health Zone, Dr Don Colbert said, “A few years ago the second-most-prescribed drug in America was a cholesterol-lowering statin drug.7 Some of the side effects of statin medication include liver damage, muscle pain and damage, neurological side effects such as confusion and memory loss, and elevated blood sugar or type 2 diabetes. Statin drugs also lower testosterone levels. Add to that the fact that a huge portion of Americans are taking antidepressant medications, which also usually decrease testosterone levels.”

Dr. Malcolm Kendrick is a British physician and author of “Doctoring Data: How to Sort Out Medical Advice from Medical Nonsense,” “The Great Cholesterol Con” and “A Statin Nation: Damaging Millions in a Brave New Post-Health World”. Kendrick states the most concerning risk factors for cardiovascular disease are actually insulin resistance, Type 2 diabetes and the chronic inflammation associated with these conditions, along with factors such as how you eat — whether you’re rushing or taking your time — and other stress-related factors, both physical and psychological.

He believes the conventional LDL/cholesterol hypothesis is flawed, in part because damage of the interior layers of your arteries precedes heart disease, and this damage can be induced by a number of factors, including smoking, high blood pressure, elevated blood sugar and inflammation.

Once the artery is damaged, cholesterol-rich plaque begins to build up as a protective mechanism. Problems arise when the rate of damage and resultant blood clot formation outpace or outstrip your body’s ability to repair. As noted by Kendrick, “For good health, you want to maintain a balance between the blood being too ready to clot, and the blood not clotting when you need it to.”

Zoe Harcombe, Ph.D. is a nutritional researcher, author and public speaker. She states, “It is virtually impossible to explain how vital cholesterol is to the human body. If you had no cholesterol in your body you would be dead.”

Contrary to popular belief, cholesterol is a crucial molecule necessary for optimal health, and not nearly the damaging culprit it’s been made out to be.

As noted by Harcombe, if your triglycerides are high, it means you’re eating too many net carbohydrates, because it’s actually sugar that causes triglycerides to rise, not dietary fat.

Dr. Aseem Malhotra, an interventional cardiologist consultant in London, U.K., gained quite a bit of publicity after the publication of his peer-reviewed editorial in BMJ in 2013, which argued that you should ignore advice to reduce your saturated fat intake, because saturated fats actually decrease your risk for obesity and heart disease. In addition to defending the merits of healthy saturated fats, Malhotra highlights the risks of statin drugs, noting that more than half of statin users stop using the drugs within a year, most citing side effects as the reason.

Fatigue, nausea, joint and muscle pain and increases in blood sugar have all been associated with statin drug use, most of which cease when the drugs are stopped. He also points out that unhealthy diet, including excess sugar consumption, is the true culprit in heart disease:

“Over 80 percent of CVD [cardiovascular disease] is attributable to environmental factors, notably unhealthy diet and also smoking, alcohol and physical inactivity. Diet has primacy, accounting for a larger burden of CVD disease and death than tobacco, alcohol and inactivity combined. For those at low risk eating an apple a day has an equivalent risk reduction for myocardial infarction [heart attack] as taking a statin.”

When you check your cholesterol, the more accurate indicator for the risk of heart disease can be found in the calculation of your HDL to triglyceride ratio. This ratio is determined by dividing your Total Cholesterol number by your total HDL number. A ratio of 5 or more is a high risk for heart disease.

5 Reasons Why You Should Not Take Statins, from Dr Mercola

1. They Don’t Work

Statin drugs work to lower cholesterol, and as your levels fall, you may assume that is proof that you’re getting healthier and lowering your risk of heart disease and heart attack. But that would be far from the truth.

There is far more that goes into your risk of heart disease than your cholesterol levels. Further, there is evidence showing that statins may actually make your heart health worse and only appear effective due to statistical deception.

One report published in the Expert Review of Clinical Pharmacology concluded that statin advocates used a statistical tool called relative risk reduction (RRR) to amplify statins’ trivial beneficial effects.

If you look at absolute risk, statin drugs benefit just 1 percent of the population. This means that out of 100 people treated with the drugs, one person will have one less heart attack. This doesn’t sound so impressive, so statin supporters use a different statistic called relative risk.

Just by making this statistical sleight of hand, statins suddenly become beneficial for 30 to 50 percent of the population. As STATS at George Mason University explained, “An important feature of relative risk is that it tells you nothing about the actual risk.”3

2. Statins Reduce CoQ10

Statins deplete your body of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), which accounts for many of their devastating results. Although it was proposed to add a black box warning to statins stating this, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) decided against it in 2014.

CoQ10 is used for energy production by every cell in your body, and is therefore vital for good health, high energy levels, longevity, and general quality of life. CoQ10’s reduced form, ubiquinol, is a critical component of cellular respiration and production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP).

ATP is a coenzyme used as an energy carrier in every cell of your body. When you consider that your heart is the most energy-demanding organ in your body, you can surmise how potentially devastating it can be to deplete your body’s main source of cellular energy.

So while one of statins’ claims to fame is warding off heart disease, you’re actually increasing your risk when you deplete your body of CoQ10. The depletion of CoQ10 caused by the drug is why statins can increase your risk of acute heart failure.

So if you’re taking a statin drug, you MUST take Coenzyme Q10 as a supplement. If you’re over 40, I would strongly recommend taking ubiquinol instead of CoQ10, as it’s far more effectively absorbed by your body.

In every study conducted so far, ubiquinol has been shown to be far more bioavailable than the non-reduced form (CoQ10). Dr. Steven Sinatra,cardiologist and founder of the New England Heart Center, recommends taking at least 100 milligrams (mg), but preferably 200 mg of high-quality CoQ10 or ubiquinol daily.

One study in the European Journal of Pharmacology showed that ubiquinol effectively rescued cells from the damage caused by the statin drug simvastatin, thereby protecting muscle cells from myopathies.

The other part most people don’t realize is that CoQ10 and ubiquinol are lipid-soluble materials biosynthesized in your blood. The carrier is the blood lipid cholesterol.

The ubiquinol actually keeps your LDL (often referred to as the “bad” cholesterol) reduced, as it’s an exceptionally potent antioxidant.

Reduced LDL cholesterol isn’t bad cholesterol at all. Only the oxidized version will cause a problem. So by reducing CoQ10 production in your body, you’re also removing the mechanism that keeps your LDL cholesterol from doing harm in your body.

3. Statins Reduce Vitamin K2

A new finding was published in March 2015, and it is not yet widely known.

Research published in Expert Review of Clinical Pharmacology revealed that, in contrast to the current belief that cholesterol reduction with statins decreases atherosclerosis, the drugs may instead actually stimulate atherosclerosis and heart failure.5

There were several physiological mechanisms discussed in the study that show how statin drugs may make your heart health worse, one being that they inhibit the synthesis of vitamin K2. Vitamin K2 protects your arteries from calcification. Without it, plaque levels worsen.

Vitamin K2’s biological role is to help move calcium into the proper areas in your body, such as your bones and teeth. It also plays a role in removing calcium from areas where it shouldn’t be, such as in your arteries and soft tissues.

According to a 2009 Dutch study, vitamin K2 is associated with reduced vascular calcification even at small dietary intakes.6

Statin drugs inhibit the function of vitamin K2 in your body, which means taking them may put you at risk of vitamin K2 deficiency, a condition known to contribute to a number of chronic diseases, including:

Osteoporosis Heart disease Heart attack and stroke
Inappropriate calcification, from heel spurs to kidney stones Brain disease Cancer

4. Statins Reduce Ketone Production

Statins lower cholesterol by inhibiting the enzyme in your liver that produces cholesterol (HMG coenzyme A reductase). Unfortunately this is the same enzyme that produces not only CoQ10 but also ketones, which are crucial nutrients to feed your mitochondria.

Ketones are vitally important biological signaling molecules. There are three ketone bodies, acetoacetate, beta hydroxybutyrate, and acetone.

They’re produced in your liver (they’re byproducts of the breakdown of fatty acids) and production increases during fasting. As noted in the journal Trends in Endocrinology & Metabolism:

Ketone bodies are emerging as crucial regulators of metabolic health and longevity, via their ability to regulate HDAC [histone deacetylases] activity and thereby epigenetic gene regulation.”

Ketone bodies appear to inhibit HDAC function, which is implicated in the regulation of aging. Further, researchers noted “ketone bodies may link environmental cues such as diet to the regulation of aging.”

5. Increased Risk of Serious Diseases

Because statins deplete your body of CoQ10, inhibit synthesis of vitamin K2, and reduce the production of ketone bodies, they increase your risk of other serious diseases. This includes:

Cancer

Research has shown that long-term statin use (10 years or longer) more than doubles women’s risk of two major types of breast cancer: invasive ductal carcinoma and invasive lobular carcinoma. According to Dr. Sinatra, statins block the squalene pathway (squalene is the precursor to cholesterol), which he believes is essential in preventing breast cancer.

In addition, the use of any statin drug, in any amount, was associated with a significantly increased risk for prostate cancer in a separate study, and there was an increasing risk that came along with an increasing cumulative dose.

According to a letter to the editor published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology:

“Several cholesterol-lowering drugs, including statins, have been found to be carcinogenic in rodents in doses that produce blood concentrations of the drugs similar to those attained in treating patients.

Diabetes

Statins have also been shown to increase your risk of diabetes via a number of different mechanisms. The most important one is that they increase insulin resistance, which can be extremely harmful to your health. Secondly, statins increase your diabetes risk by raising your blood sugar. Statins work by preventing your liver from making cholesterol.

As a result, your liver returns the sugar to your bloodstream, which raises your blood sugar levels. These drugs also rob your body of certain valuable nutrients, which can also impact your blood sugar levels. Two nutrients in particular, vitamin D and CoQ10, are both needed to maintain ideal blood glucose levels. A 2011 meta-analysis confirmed the higher the dosage of statin drugs being taken, the greater the diabetes risk.

1 out of every 498 people who are on a high-dose statin regimen will develop diabetes.

The following scientific reviews also reached the conclusion that statin use is associated with increased incidence of new-onset diabetes:

A 2010 meta-analysis of 13 statin trials, consisting of 91,140 participants, found that statin therapy was associated with a 9 percent increased risk for incident diabetes. Here, the number needed to harm was 255 over four years, meaning for every 255 people on the drug, one developed diabetes as a result of the drug in that period of time.

In a 2009 study, statin use was associated with a rise of fasting plasma glucose in patients with and without diabetes, independently of other factors such as age, and use of aspirin, β-blockers, or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors.

The study included data from more than 345,400 patients over a period of two years. On average, statins increased fasting plasma glucose in non-diabetic statin users by 7 mg/dL, and in diabetics, statins increased glucose levels by 39 mg/dL.

Neurodegenerative Diseases

Cholesterol is also essential for your brain, which contains about 25 percent of the cholesterol in your body. It is critical for synapse formation, i.e. the connections between your neurons, which allow you to think, learn new things, and form memories. So perhaps it’s not surprising that memory loss is widely reported in association with statin use.

Further, remember that statins reduce ketone production. Ketone bodies are used as fuel by your brain, and they have also demonstrated the capacity to protect against neuronal disease, seizures, and age-related brain diseases, such as Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s, and Parkinson’s. Researchers from Penn State College of Medicine even found statins were associated with an increased Parkinson’s risk.

High total cholesterol and LDL were also associated with a lower risk of Parkinson’s disease. The study concluded, “Statin use may be associated with a higher PD [Parkinson’s disease] risk, whereas higher total cholesterol may be associated with lower risk.”

Musculoskeletal Disorders

Statin users are more likely to suffer from musculoskeletal conditions, injuries and pain than non-users. Myalgia, muscle weakness, muscle cramps, rhabdomyolysis, autoimmune muscle disease, and tendinous diseases have all been reported in association with statin use.

One reason for this may be statins’ interference with selenium-containing proteins. Selenoproteins such as glutathione peroxidase are crucial for preventing oxidative damage in your muscle tissue. As reported by Wellness Resources:

Blocking the selenoprotein enzyme glutathione peroxidase is akin to pouring gasoline on the fire of inflammation and free radicals, which damages muscle tissue. In fact, the scientists described this blocking of the selenoproteins reminiscent of selenium deficiency induced heart failure, known as Keshan’s disease first identified in the 1930s.”

Cataracts

An objective review of PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane review databases found that for every 10,000 people taking a statin, there were 307 extra patients with cataracts. This was supported by a separate JAMA study, which further revealed that the risk of cataracts is increased among statin users compared with non-users. Cataract is a clouding of your eye lens and is a main cause of low vision among the elderly.

In order to protect yourself against heart disease, here are a number of suggestions that can help you lower your insulin resistance and restore your insulin sensitivity, among other heart-protective mechanisms:

  • Avoid environmental pollutants and toxins, including smoking, vaping, heavy metals, herbicides and pesticides, especially glyphosate.
  • Eat an unprocessed whole food-based diet low in net carbs and high in healthy fats. A ketogenic diet — which is very low in net carbohydrates and high in healthy fats — is key for boosting mitochondrial function.
  • When your body is able to burn fat for fuel, your liver creates water-soluble fats called ketones that burn far more efficiently than carbs, thereby creating fewer reactive oxygen species and secondary free radicals. Ketones also decrease inflammation and improve glucose metabolism.
  • Eat nitrate-rich foods to help normalize your blood pressure. Good sources include arugula, cilantro, rhubarb, butter leaf lettuce, mesclun mixed greens, beet greens, fresh beet juice, kvass (fermented beet juice) and fermented beet powder.
  • Get plenty of nonexercise movement each day; walk more and incorporate higher intensity exercise as your health allows.
  • Get sensible sun exposure to optimize your vitamin D status and/or take an oral vitamin D3 supplement with magnesium and vitamin K2.
  • Implement heart-based wellness practices such as connecting with loved ones and practicing gratitude.

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Opinions expressed on this blog are those of the writer and have not been reviewed by the FDA, CDC or other 'medical authorities'. Therefore, any products discussed are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease, but rather are dietary supplements intended solely for nutritional use.

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