HFE Magazine

August 15, 2018

BDNF Important Letters to Remember for Brain Health

Filed under: Depression,Family — Tags: , — Gail @ 12:55 pm


by Dr David Perlmutter

We’ve all come to accept the notion that our brain will continue to shrink as we age. And nowhere is this decline more impactful than in the hippocampus, the brain’s memory center. Researchers measuring the size of the hippocampus using MRI scans demonstrate a clear correlation between shrinkage of the hippocampus and declining cognitive function.

Challenging the status quo notion that loss of hippocampal function is inevitable, is new and exciting research showing that we have the potential to actually grow new cells in this vitally important area of the brain, expanding the hippocampus in size and enhancing memory function.

The growth of new cells in the brain, neurogenesis, is enhanced under the influence of a specific protein called BDNF. And while there is no pharmaceutical approach to increasing BDNF, animal research has long recognized that aerobic exercise causes a robust increase in BDNF levels and as a consequence, increases both the growth of new cells in the hippocampus as well as increase in memory.

But while the animal research has long confirmed the relationship between aerobic exercise and the growth of new brain cells, this relationship has been only recently demonstrated to occur
in humans.

Neuroscientist Kirk Erikson and his research team at the University of Pittsburgh publishing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science studied a group of 120 adults over a one year span.

Half the group was given a stretching program to perform 3 times each week while the other half engaged in 3 days of aerobics.

After one year, the two groups were evaluated looking at three parameters. First, using MRI scans, the change in size of the hippocampus was calculated. Second, serum measurements before and after the trial were measured. And finally, the study actually measured memory function at the beginning and end of the trial.

The results were breathtaking. While the group doing the stretching program manifested a decline in memory, hippocampal size and BDNF levels, the aerobics group showed not only improvement in memory, but actually an increase in the size of the hippocampus accompanied by an increase in their blood levels of BDNF. The authors concluded: “These results clearly indicate that aerobic exercise is neuroprotective and that starting an exercise regimen later in life is not futile for either enhancing cognition or augmenting brain volume.” Simply stated, this landmark research demonstrated that aerobic exercise increases the growth of new stem cells in the human brain, and these stem cells mature to become fully functioning neurons.

The important role of BDNF in preserving brain function was the subject of a landmark report in the prestigious Journal of the American Medical Association. In the report, researchers showed that blood levels of BDNF almost perfectly predict future risk for declining brain function as long as 10 years in the future.

The results of these studies have huge implications. Multiple studies have now confirmed the fact that aerobic exercise can turn on the genetic machinery to manufacture BDNF, the brain’s “growth hormone,” creating new stem cells that become fully functioning neurons in the brain’s memory center and actually improving memory. Despite the lack of any pharmaceutical development to enhance this process, you have direct control of your BDNF levels and thus the fate of your brain.

You can increase your BDNF levels and enhance the growth of new brain cells and memory. Here’s how:
Engage in regular aerobic exercise. I recommend 20 minutes per day, 6 days each week. A good target heart rate is around 180 minus your age. Your specific target rate will depend on your level of fitness as well as medications you may be taking. That said, it’s always a good idea to check with a healthcare practitioner before engaging in a new exercise program.

The omega-3, DHA, like aerobic exercise, has been shown to activate the genes that turn on BDNF production. So take a supplement that contains DHA. DHA is available in fish oils as well as algae-derived (suitable for vegetarians) products. While krill oil is popular, the DHA content is typically only 10% of fish or algae-based products. My recommendation is a dosage of DHA of around 800mg daily.

Curcumin, the main active ingredient in the spice turmeric, is currently the subject of intense scientific inquiry, especially as it relates to the brain. But curcumin isn’t new to medical research as it has been used in traditional Chinese and Indian (Ayurvedic) medicine for thousands of years. Curcumin is known to possess a variety of biochemical properties including antioxidant, anti- inflammatory, anti-fungal, and antibacterial activities. But most exciting, as it relates to the brain, extensive research confirms that in humans, consumption of curcumin is associated with a significant rise in BDNF levels.

In a recent report in Food and Nutrition Sciences, researchers demonstrated how whole coffee fruit concentrate (WCFC) affected BDNF levels in humans. The study involved 20 young adults (25-35 years) who were asked to consume whole coffee fruit concentrate powder followed by blood evaluations of their BDNF levels. Remarkably, BDNF levels actually doubled in those individuals taking the whole coffee fruit concentrate in comparison to those who were given coffee or a placebo.

In another study published in the British Journal of Nutrition, researchers administered a single 100mg dose of whole coffee fruit extract to a group of volunteers and observed a 143% increase in their blood values of BDNF. WCFC is a patented extract of whole coffee fruit (coffee berries) from the common coffee bean, Coffea arabica. It contains chemicals called procyanidins which are known to protect brain cells, as well as a unique profile of polyphenols that may well relate to its ability to raise BDNF so dramatically.

Again, BDNF is powerfully influential in determining your brain’s destiny, so these new scientific reports showing the dramatic rise in BDNF with whole coffee fruit concentrate are very exciting, especially for me as a neuroscientist.

November 15, 2017

Herb for Depression and Weight Gain

By Dr Don Colbert Rhodiola rosea, also referred to as Golden Root, is an adaptogen of the herbal world. It is indigenous to Asian Artic regions, European, and North American mountainous areas. This flowering plant was once used by Scandinavian Vikings and Emperors of China. In the past it was well-known for building strength, but […]

October 14, 2017

7 Signs You May Have a Vitamin D Deficiency

Vitamin D deficiency is incredibly common in the US, but many Americans mistakenly believe they aren’t at risk because they consume vitamin-D-fortified foods (such as milk). There are very few foods that actually have therapeutic levels of vitamin D naturally and even fortified foods do not contain enough vitamin D to support your health needs. […]

October 9, 2017

Is Turmeric Good for Depression Too?

by Gail Bowman   We have all heard how good turmeric is for inflammation.  There are many articles available that tell us that turmeric is beneficial for inflammation, and in fact is among the most effective anti-inflammatory compounds in the world. However, many do not realize the benefits of  Turmeric for Depression. According to a meta-analysis of […]

February 23, 2017

Top 5 Natural Calming Remedies

by Lisa Gallo for Garden of Life While stress is an inevitable part of life, a recent survey of adults by the American Psychological Association found that overall stress levels have been on the rise. We know that stress is harmful to both mental and physical health. So how can we manage our stress levels? […]

August 17, 2016

Avoiding the Afternoon Slump: Maca, the Caffeine-Free Alternative

by Dr. Erin Stokes, ND and Megafood The mid-afternoon slump. It can hit you when you least expect it. It often sets in when you still have a long way to go on your work and home “to do” lists for the day. In those moments, it’s so tempting to reach for that second (or third) […]

June 15, 2015

Low Levels of Vitamin B12 Are Often Missed

Recently published on Dr Mercola: Most physicians do not routinely test their patients’ vitamin B12 levels. Even if you have yours tested, the levels considered “normal” in the U.S. may still be too low. Normal ranges of vitamin B12 in the U.S. are 200 pg/mL to 1100 pg/mL, even though people at the lower end of this […]

October 6, 2014

Omega 3s

Two earlier studies published in April 2007 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition reported that regular consumption of omega-3-rich food could prevent age-related cognitive decline.

September 1, 2014

Trans Fat

Trans Fat Free and Healthy? Jordan Rubin from Extraordinary Health Magazine The war against trans fats has been an ongoing battle that reached a peak in recent years. In 2003 the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) decided that trans fats should be listed on food labels. A year later, mounting scientific data led an […]

August 19, 2014

A Deadly Disposition

Hard-heartedness is defined as “an absence of concern for the welfare of others,” being “cold-hearted,” or “lacking in feeling; pitiless; cold.” The Bible contains numerous references to people being hard-hearted, and none of them carry positive connotations or results. One such reference is found in the person of Pharaoh.

Older Posts »
Opinions expressed on this blog are those of the writer and have not been reviewed by the FDA, CDC or other 'medical authorities'. Therefore, any products discussed are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease, but rather are dietary supplements intended solely for nutritional use.

Sponsered by:HealthFoodEmporium.com and Whole-Food-Vitamins.com Hosted by 2Falls.com